Archive for June, 2008

New genealogy website

Saturday, June 14th, 2008

AncestralSpace

Made especially for those that cant get enough of myspace/facebook type sites (and yes I realize some of you will have NO interest in this at all)

Some of you may wonder…why a site like this. Well I will tell you. Last year I made a myspace page for my genealogy forum and found lots of friends that have genealogy as an interest. Wednesday, I was “interviewed” about my thoughts on myspace and genealogy….did it help?

I got to thinking, nope, I’ve not found one piece of information or person with which to share information on myspace other than “genealogy news”

Then I got to thinking….I had seen a “myspace” type site for another hobby I’m interested in but I didnt know of one for one of the most widespread hobbies in the world. Why not have a social sight for people that were not looking to “find a date or a mate”.

People that know me, know I have a passion for research and for helping other people find things and for helping other people find living relatives that might help them break down their brickwalls.

Will this work? I don’t know…I have high hopes for it.

This site will be a work in progress for many weeks to come I’m sure, and suggestions are always welcome even if I might not always do what you suggest.

This is gonna be fun….yeah its gonna be fun

In Flew Enza

Monday, June 9th, 2008

Ever wonder about the spanish flu? One of our most esteemed members (who just happens to be my mother lol) posted something on the forum that she had written for our family history awhile back.

It was first printed in Paper Plates, Napkins and Other Musings:

In Flew Enza
I had a little bird
It’s name was Enza
I opened the window
and in flew Enza.

A simple little jump rope rhyme to commemorate the worst epidemic this country has ever seen. One quarter of the population was wiped out in this outbreak. I have no records which of our family members succumbed to Spanish Flu, but there were a number who died in this time frame. It was devastating enough to merit a few paragraphs in any family history.

There has never been absolute proof where the epidemic started. Evidence seems to indicate it began at Fort Riley, Kansas in early Spring 1918. Soldiers burned tons of cow manure. As this was being done a gale sprang up unexpectedly. It became a virtual dust storm. The sun went black. Two days later on March 11 a private reported to the infirmary with a fever, sore throat and headache. Less than a minute later another soldier reported the same symptoms. By noon there were 100 cases, by nightfall, 500. Forty-eight men died in this initial onslaught. Then it seemed to disappear.

This was a good time in this country. Women had the vote, we had airmail, smallpox, anthrax, diphtheria and rabies had all been identified and cured. The country was behind the war effort 100%, celebrating with parades and parties-breeding grounds for an airborne virus. Something no one could hope to identify. Virus were not visible until the invention of the electron microscope, still far in our future.

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